For one week only, "Hot Summer's Knight" is ON SALE at Amazon US and Amazon UK for the ridiculously low price of $US0.99.

Buy my novel "Hot Summer's Knight" from Amazon now!
Buy my novel "Hot Summer's Knight" from Amazon now!

It's a thriller and a romance set in medieval France, a great read for a rainy Sunday or a quiet night in. (Guys, don't let the word"romance" put you off, there's plenty in there for you too.)

It doesn't pretend to be Literature, it's got less bondage than "Fifty Shades", the body count is low, and there aren't any car chases at all. Despite this I'm sure you'll enjoy it.

So for less than the price of a cup of coffee give yourself a treat, and click on one of the links in the first paragraph. If you haven't got a Kindle, Amazon provide you with the free software. Remember to leave a review on Amazon!

My goal is to sell 1,000 copies this week. Use the social media buttons at the side of this page and help make "Hot Summer's Knight" go, if not viral, at least slightly contagious!

1

When I was studying for my degree I concentrated mainly on European history, partly because the history of European settlement in Australia really doesn't go back much more than a couple of centuries, providing you start with the colony at Botany Bay, established in 1788. European explorers had visited various places around the continent before then, but detailed, documented Australian history usually begins at that year.

Part of the surviving Norman wall around Wexford and the Water Gate.
Part of the surviving Norman wall around Wexford and the Water Gate.

For the purposes of this blog post I'm ignoring the wreck of the Batavia in 1629. Although settlements were established at that time they were short lived. There are still, however, genetic traces of Dutch sailors who were possibly adopted by Aboriginal tribes on the coast of Western Australia, although there is no way of knowing if they were from the Batavia or other ships wrecked in the area. ...continue reading "A Walled Town & Oliver Cromwell"

In keeping with the whole Irish thing, my hair has a greenish look to it at the moment. A bit of research on the internet (how did I ever live without it?) reveals that it's the combined effect of copper pipes and slightly acidic water.

A birch wood on the way to Mt. Leinster.
A birch wood on the way to Mt. Leinster.

This blog post is a little later than usual, not because I'm having a green hair day, but due to my attending a political meeting recently. Too good an opportunity not to write about, and I didn't want to wait until next week's entry. ...continue reading "Dipping a Toe into Irish Politics"

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At night when I turn off my light to sleep, there's still plenty of light in the sky. In the morning when I wake it's full daylight, even though it's still only 6:00am. With six weeks to go until the summer equinox, I wonder how short the nights will be then.

A side street in Graig na Managh, the Village of the Monks. The sun came out after a shower, shining through the new leaves on the trees.
A side street in Graig na Managh, the Village of the Monks. The sun came out after a shower, shining through the new leaves on the trees.

...continue reading "The Small Details of Daily Life"

2

The reminders of war seem to be everywhere I go here. As an Australian, it's not something I'm used to.

As I write this, outside the windows are the lush, peaceful fields of Ireland. Not far from where I sit sheep, cattle and horses enjoy the new spring growth. The grass is such an intense green it almost hurts my eyes.

Taken on the road from Thomastown to Borris, the Blackstairs Mountains in the distance.
Taken on the road from Thomastown to Borris, the Blackstairs Mountains in the distance.

It would be easy to believe this place has always been as peaceful as it is now. ...continue reading "War & Peace"